Bambi Cantrell is one of the world’s most decorated and sought after professional photographers of our time. She’s been recognized by everyone from Microsoft to American Photo Magazine and was the first woman to be honored with the prestigious “Golden Eye” award from the Russian Federation of Professional Photographers. Clearly she’s got the technical side of her game in order.

But we feel one of the main reasons why she’s shot for The Estee Lauder Family, legendary basketball player Gary Payton, and members of the Royal Family, Dubai, UAE is her ability to really make her subjects comfortable. The ability to connect plays a huge role in getting truly personal shots that make her portraits really resonate.

This interview with Camille Seaman is packed with so much goodness. She talks about using natural lighting in shooting subjects as varied as giant icebergs to TIbetans who don’t use lights indoors at all during the day. More importantly what really struck a chord is how WHO a photographer is plays a central role in their work.

Erik Johansson is an amazing Photographer and Retoucher. He has some of the most creative photos you’ll ever see. In this TED talk he talks about how he comes up with his concepts and the process of taking an idea and turning it into an amazing image.

 

 

 

 

If you missed why I’m quoting excerpts from the book Damn Good Advice, by George Lois see my earlier post

George Lois Damn Good Advice

An artist, or advertising man, or anyone involved in a creative industry (or even noncreative professions such as a doctor, lawyer, electrician, factory worker, or president) without an idea, is unarmed. In the graphic arts, when that original idea springs out of a creative’s head and intuitions, the mystical and artful blending (or even juxtaposition) of concept, image, words, and art can lead to magic, where one and one can indeed be three.

But creating ideas without a work ethic to follow through is inconceivable to me

If you don’t burn out at the end of each day, you’re a bum! People watching me work ask me all the time why I’m not burnt out, how  (especially now at my age) I manage to keep going. The fact is, I’m totally burnt out at the end of each day because I’ve given myself totally to my work–mentally, emotionally, physically. When I head home at night I can’t see straight. But I love that feeling of utter depletion: It is an ecstatic sense of having committed myself to the absolute limit. But after recharging at night, I’m ready to go the next morning. Isn’t that what life is all about?

 

Damn Good Advice a book by George Lois

“Creativity can solve almost any problem—

the creative act,

the defeat of habit by originality,

overcomes everything”

George Lois

Buy the book

 

I want to introduce you to a book you need to read, if you’re a creative professional, or anyone who wants to lead a creative life (which is you if you’re reading this.) Here’s where the story starts—one of my favorite documentaries is “Art & Copy” (watch on Netflix) and again if your a creative, this is a must see. This film covers the stories of a dozen or so of the most kick-ass advertising folks over the last 50 years, and gets into their approach and style. ‘Nuff said, just watch it.

Featured in the film is George Lois, one of the most influential figures in advertising. I got in touch and asked about his process and he said he had a new book coming out that answers this  fully. So his publicist was kind enough to send me an advance copy, which I tore into and LOVED. They were then also generous in providing us with some excerpts from the book, “DAMN GOOD ADVICE (for people with talent!)” Here’s the first installment. Read each as post them and tell us how you can apply this to your creative endeavor, whatever it may be.—Marc

George Lois Damn Good Advice

My Anti-Slogan: “George, be careful!”

Looking up from my crib on a dark and stormy night, God commanded: “George, be careful.” (I remember it well.) My earliest childhood recollections were punctuated by three words (in Greek) from the lips of my mother, Vasilike Thanasoulis Lois: “George, be careful.” They have been a refrain throughout my life–a sincere admonition from the lips of people who have always meant well but never fathomed my attitude towards life and work. In the act of creativity, being careful guarantees sameness and mediocrity, which means your work will be invisible.

Better to be reckless than careful. Better to be bold than safe. Better to have your work seen and remembered, or you’ve struck out. There is no middle ground.

 

Damn Good Advice a book by George Lois

“Creativity can solve almost any problem—

the creative act,

the defeat of habit by originality,

overcomes everything”

George Lois

Buy the book


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