Should Your Guests Take Pictures at Your Wedding Ceremony?

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The topic of wedding guests taking photos at the ceremony, has started to gain more and more interest in the last couple of years.  I was just getting started in the industry and was second shooting for another photographer  the first time I saw a wedding where the guests were NOT allowed to take photos at the ceremony. The minister announced that the bride requested that all cell phones and cameras be turned off. In this particular case, I was a bit turned off myself by the idea. I thought maybe because the delivery was a bit harsh and abrupt. I was thinking about how if I was at the wedding, I would want to be taking photos on my phone or with my camera.

As I shot more and more weddings I started to see the benefit of this, but for a little different reason than some photographers. Many photographers protest the idea of guests taking photos because they get in their way. This certainly can be quite challenging to say the least. As photographers, it is our responsibility to get the shot either way and I tend to chalk this sort of thing up as normal wedding craziness. Although, it hit me at one wedding as I was standing back watching things from the side. I was sitting there watching one guest frantically start playing with the settings on her camera while off in the distance was Grandpa trying to get his iPhone to focus.  It hit me just how much of the special moment they were missing. They were not there in the moment. They were stuck in camera settings, trying to get the shot!

Now, THAT is the problem I see with guests taking photos during a ceremony. The bride and groom have hired a pro to worry about all of the camera business while you sit and enjoy the moment with the couple. I think there is a way that you can communicate that to your guests so they understand that viewpoint a bit better and won’t be put off by it. I myself, have been working on some creative ideas to better inform guests of how to get copies of the wedding photos so they know they won’t miss any moments. I’m sure as time goes on we will see more and more crafty and fun ideas on this all over the web.

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In this technology age, it is easy to get lost in our cell phones. We are always, texting, tweeting, checking email, networking etc. So just realize that for some people it is a little startling to issue a “cell phone shutdown” during a big event. But, with some gentle reminding of the true reason they are all there, you can have a beautiful ceremony with the true presence of ALL of your guests.

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Photos courtesy of lookweddingphotography.com

 

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Five friends are reunited, and Ringo Starr couldn’t be happier. A 50-year-old photographic mystery was solved when five Beatles fans got back together to recreate a classic photo taken by Starr during The Beatles’ first trip to the United States in 1964.

Last week Starr wondered about the identities of the five young fans seen in the picture. The former drummer snapped the picture when their Chevy Impala rolled up next to his limousine when the Fab 4 visited New York City for the first time.

“They’re looking at us, and I’m photographing them,” Starr writes in his new book, Photograph.

NBC found the five fans, now all in their 60′s, and arranged to have them flown out to appear on the Today Show to talk about the moment they were captured in Ringo’s photograph. They even recreated the famous image.

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“When Ringo rolled down the window, of course we were so excited,” said passenger Suzanne Rayot. “He said ‘hello, love’. I didn’t know who he was saying that to — but I hoped it was me.”

Gary Van Deursen, the toothy face behind the wheel, called the entire experience “unbelievable.”

“I didn’t know he’d even taken a picture!” he said.

And now the group gets to meet the photographer himself. NBC is flying them out to Las Vegas to meet Ringo, where they can finally reminisce about the famous photograph.

“How great that they found these people! And how cool to now know a little of their story and what that moment was like from their perspective,” Starr said in a statement. “I look forward to meeting them.”

Ringo Starr’s new book, Photograph, which releases on Nov. 22, showcases over 250 rare and unseen images from his childhood and his days with The Beatles. Read more about it here.

RFK Assassination Photographer Bill Eppridge Dies At 75

Bill Eppridge

Bill Eppridge stands in front of his work at Photo LA’s 22nd Annual Photographic Art Exposition on January 17, 2003 in Santa Monica, California. Photo:  Leslie Nestor Miranda, FilmMagic

 

Bill Eppridge, a celebrated photojournalist most famous for snapping Senator Robert F. Kennedy as he lay dying from a gunshot wound in 1968, has died at a hospital in Connecticut. He was 75.

Eppridge’s career lasted more than five decades and included stints working for magazines like National Geographic and Sports Illustrated. He photographed athletes and celebrities, documented Woodstock and the Beatles’ first concert in the U.S., and contributed award-winning photo essays to Life magazine.

But it was his picture of a dying Kennedy — a ghostly, back-lit image of the Senator lying on the floor of the Ambassador Hotel in Los Angeles, his head cradled by busboy Juan Romero — that would be his most famous achievement. The photograph captured the tragic moment perfectly, and Eppridge knew it.

“He said in effect he was no longer a photographer. He became a historian at that point,” said fellow Life photographer Bob Gomel. “He meant the picture was of such consequence it became a moment in history.”

The photo essay “Needle Park” is another stunning piece of Eppridge’s work. Published in Life magazine in 1965, it’s a harrowing portrait of “two lives lost to heroin.” The controversial spread, combined with reporting from Life associate editor James Mills, provided the basis for the 1971 movie Panic In Needle Park with Al Pacino. You can see the essay in its entirety at Life.com.

A new book of Eppridge’s photography, “The Beatles: Six Days That Changed the World. February, 1964,” is set to come out early next year.

Miley Cyrus Wanted To Study Photography At NYU

Miley Cyrus on the cover of Rolling Stone

Miley Cyrus on the cover of Rolling Stone

 

Miley Cyrus didn’t always want to be America’s reigning Twerk Queen. In fact, the “Wrecking Ball” singer says she seriously considered going to college to study photography.

In her recent highly-publicized interview with Rolling Stone magazine, Cyrus, 20, says she almost opted to enroll at New York University after finishing her television show Hannah Montana in order to study photography.

She told Rolling Stone, “Once I ended (Hannah Montana), I thought I might go to NYU or something and study photography. Or to Savannah – they’ve got a really good school in Savannah. I love photography. I have a Canon 5D. I want to co-direct something soon. When they’re saying, ‘Change this lens to this millimeter,’ I want to know what they’re talking about.”

Of course that didn’t happen. Cyrus ended up focusing on her music career instead, and the rest is history.

As for her passion for photography, the “Wrecking Ball” singer apparently still enjoys doing it as a hobby. She recently listed her old Nikon N80 35mm SLR camera on auction website eBay.com.

Fake Wedding Photographer Scams $140,000 From Couples

 

Michael De Rubeis' mugshot.

Michael De Rubeis’ mugshot.

 

When it comes to hiring a wedding photographer, never underestimate the power of background research. A man in New Jersey was arrested after playing wedding photographer and bilking thousands from unsuspecting couples, ruining what should have been the happiest day of their lives.

Michael De Rubeis has been charged with six counts of theft by deception and six counts of impersonation after allegedly scamming 38 couples out of nearly $140,000. Arrested in April, De Rubeis used aliases, several different business names, and an intentionally disorganized operation to keep from having to deliver precious photographs to the clients that were unfortunate enough to hire him.

“That’s the statement that I’ve heard from almost every victim, that their wedding has been ruined,” said Detective Sgt. James Briggs.

De Rubeis, operating under the name Michael Distasio, pulled the same scam in 2003 when he was sued for deceptive practices in New York. An investigation revealed De Rubeis and his wife operated under at least five different business names. The couple reportedly produced poor-quality images, sent substitute photographers to weddings, and intentionally gave their clients the run-around when asked for a refund. In all they accumulated more than 150 complaints before authorities stepped in.

Of course, De Rubeis didn’t just steal money from these people. He also produced some pretty dismal work.

“Afghan Girl” by Steve McCurry. Credit: National Geographic

 

Over the last 125 years National Geographic has been host to some of the most iconic images ever taken, and now the magazine is honoring its most celebrated shots with an issue devoted entirely to them.

The October 2013 issue will feature instantly recognizable photographs from the magazine’s past — including National Geographic’s most famous image, Steve McCurry’s “Afghan Girl.”

The issue also includes a stirring essay from writer and photographer Robert Draper.

“Today photography has become a global cacophony of freeze-frames. Millions of pictures are uploaded every minute,” Draper writes.

“Correspondingly, everyone is a subject, and knows it — any day now we will be adding the unguarded moment to the endangered species list. It’s on this hyper-egalitarian, quasi-Orwellian, all-too-camera-ready ‘terra infirma’ that National Geographic’s photographers continue to stand out.”

Here’s to hoping Nat Geo’s photographers stand out for a long time to come. Check out a few more of the magazine’s most famous images below.

 

Photo by Steve McCurry, 1991 | Kuwait Under the black clouds of burning oil fields during the Gulf War, camels forage desperately for shrubs and water in southern Kuwait. Front-line photographs of regions ravaged by human strife can also illuminate war’s environmental cost.

Photo by Steve McCurry, 1991 | Kuwait. Under the black clouds of burning oil fields during the Gulf War, camels forage desperately for shrubs and water in southern Kuwait. Front-line photographs of regions ravaged by human strife can also illuminate war’s environmental cost.

 

Photo by Paul Nicklen 2004 | Canada Its image mirrored in icy water, a polar bear travels submerged—a tactic often used to surprise prey. Scientists fear global warming could drive bears to extinction sometime this century.

Photo by Paul Nicklen, 2004 | Canada. Its image mirrored in icy water, a polar bear travels submerged—a tactic often used to surprise prey. Scientists fear global warming could drive bears to extinction sometime this century.

 

Photo by Luis Marden Texas | 1939 A cowgirl dropped a nickel in a parking meter to hitch her pony. When this photo was taken El Paso was still a highly horse-conscious town wiht many cattle-ranch residents.

Photo by Luis Marden, Texas | 1939. A cowgirl dropped a nickel in a parking meter to hitch her pony. When this photo was taken El Paso was still a highly horse-conscious town with many cattle-ranch residents.

 

Paul Nicklen/National Geographic. Nicklen: "I expected this leopard seal to flee with her catch, a live penguin chick, but she dropped it on my camera." (Antarctica, 2006)

Paul Nicklen/National Geographic. Nicklen: “I expected this leopard seal to flee with her catch, a live penguin chick, but she dropped it on my camera.” (Antarctica, 2006)

 

Photo by John Stanmeyer/National Geographic2010  | Dzitnup, MexicoA single frame can transport us to one of our planet’s far-flung and beautiful places. In this one, stalactites and a sunbeam spotlight a swimmer in the Xkeken cenote, a natural well in the Yucatán thought by the Maya to lead to the underworld

Photo by John Stanmeyer/National Geographic, 2010 | Dzitnup, Mexico. A single frame can transport us to one of our planet’s far-flung and beautiful places. In this one, stalactites and a sunbeam spotlight a swimmer in the Xkeken cenote, a natural well in the Yucatán thought by the Maya to lead to the underworld

Priest Stops Wedding To Scold Photographer [VIDEO]

 

In the rush to capture all the best moments at a wedding, photographers should always be aware of when to get closer … and when to take a big step back. One wedding photographer found this out the hard way when he was reprimanded in the middle of the ceremony.

In a YouTube video posted last week, an officiant at a wedding can be seen delivering vows to the bride and groom when all of a sudden he turns around to address a cameraman.

“Please. Sirs. Leave.”

Stunned, the cameraman asks “Where do you want me to be?”

“Anywhere other than here,” the priest says, as the bride and groom look at each other in the background, clearly embarrassed. “This is a solemn assembly. Not a photography session. Please move. Or I will stop. I will stop this ceremony if you do not get out of the way. This is not about the photography. This is about God.”

At that moment the photographer, Kamrul Hasan, and the rest of his crew hastily pack up their gear and shuffle away from the altar.

In an interview with ABC, Hasan says he was completely caught off-guard by the priest’s outburst.

“He just snapped out of nowhere,” Hasan said. “I just couldn’t believe it.”

Hasan added that at no time in the pre-ceremony did the priest set boundaries — a meeting that likely would have prevented the misunderstanding.

“My responsibility is to capture the great shot,” he said. “But at the same time I do not want to interrupt the ceremony.”

We’ve interviewed plenty of wedding photographers (check out this video with Anna Kuperberg) but we’ve never heard of such a confrontation. Photographers have a responsibility to remain respectful while they do their jobs, yet they also have to get images that show the intimacy of the ceremony. And that means getting as close as possible.

So did Hasan overstep his boundaries? Or does the Priest have a valid complaint? Check out the video below and let us know what you think.

‘Astronomy Photographer Of The Year’ Winners Announced

Photographer Mark Gee's winning entry, titled "Guiding Light to the Stars." Copyright by Mark Gee.

 

Space may be the final frontier for man, but his cameras have been probing its depths for quite some time.

The annual Astronomy Photographers of the Year competition draws entries from some of the world’s best “big-picture” photographers, and this year’s class lived up to its name. This year’s winners consist of beautiful images of everything from our own solar system to the furthest reaches of the galaxy.

The top images were revealed during a presentation at the Royal Observatory in Greenwich, England, in association with Sky at Night Magazine.

Australian photographer Mark Gee took top prize at this year’s competition with “Guiding Light to the Stars” — an incredible panorama of the Milky Way galaxy taken from New Zealand — which won the “Earth and Space” Category and was named best photograph overall. Read about how Gee captured the amazing image here.

The 2013 competition was split into four categories: Earth and Space, Our Solar System, Deep Space, and Young Astronomy Photographer of the Year. There were also three special awards, including one in the Robotic Scope category — images taken remotely by a robotic telescope camera.

From breathtaking images of Venus’ transit to the purple and blue swirls of distant nebulae, the competition culled some truly incredible photos from some truly talented photographers. Check out all the winners at the observatory’s website.

Also be sure to submit your own photograph’s for next year’s contest, which starts right now. Because you know how the saying goes: shoot for the moon, and you’ll land amongst the stars.

 

In the latest video from Silber Studios, Marc goes behind the scenes with photographer Bob Holmes at the Hess Collection in Napa Valley. Holmes, a three-time Travel Photographer of the Year, takes Marc on a tour of the incredible gallery while offering tips for lighting, framing, and finding punctuation points in your photographs.

“Know your equipment.” The saying might seem obvious at first, but listen to the way Bob explains the importance of a photographer’s familiarity with his camera and you’ll have a new-found appreciation for your equipment. Watch as he shows Marc actual examples during an impromptu photo shoot at one of the world’s most prestigious wineries.

Holmes is an internationally revered travel photographer whose images have appeared in Time Magazine, National Geographic, and The New York Times. Check out other interviews we’ve done with Bob to help improve your photography, and be sure to check out more of his work at Robert HolmesPhotography.com

Kate Upton on Vanity Fair

Kate Upton on the 100th Anniversary issue of Vanity Fair. Photo by Annie Leibovitz.

 

For Vanity Fair’s 100th anniversary issue, the magazine enlisted one of the world’s most famous celebrity photographers to shoot one the world’s most famous celebrities.

Annie Leibovitz (whom SilberStudios had the pleasure of meeting at a retrospective of her work a couple years ago) photographs model and actress Kate Upton for the celebratory cover, and the result is a glossy, stylish take on classic Hollywood bombshells.

The cover shows Upton doing her sultriest Marilyn Monroe impression, all buxom and blue-eyed. Inside the issue Upton and Leibovitz even stage a moon shoot — a recreation of the cover of the original Vanity Fair from 1913.

Leibovitz, 61, also appears in a behind behind-the-scenes video released by Vanity Fair, showing the photographer at work with Upton. The clip is short but we still get a quick peek into Leibovitz’s shooting style and lighting configurations.

The October issue of Vanity Fair hits stands nationwide on September 10. In the meantime, check out Upton and Leibovitz on set in the video below.


Annie Leibovitz photographs Kate Upton for Vanity Fair

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