We recently met back up with Bob Holmes and asked him to show us what’s in his bag. He gave us a look inside with some good tips along the way for cleaning dust from your camera’s card slots, packing spare equipment and packing a separate bag for use in the field and more–and catch the outtake at the end!.  Thanks to Bob holmes for sharing. Be sure to catch his other videos
And thanks to our friends at ThinkTank

Video Tutorial: How to Use your Camera’s Histogram

What the heck is that thing called a “histogram” and how do you use it anyway?

A histogram is a graph that shows the exposure from pure black on the left, to pure white on the right. It is a tool you can use to see how well your image will be exposed in your camera. One of the secrets of photography is to learn to “see” what your camera sees. Your eye can see a much wider range of light than your camera, so using the histogram can help you see only the range of light that the camera will capture. The word histogram is derived from histo meaning mast (the vertical lines) and gram denoting something written or recorded–as a graph. So in our case it is a graph showing the range of light being exposed on your camera’s sensor.

Master photographer Joe Holmes gave us a short tour of how to use your histogram, with some tips for getting “perfect exposures.”  Watch this video then grab your camera, take some shots and look at your histogram and see what you can learn from it.

Note: You also have a histogram in your photo editing software like PhotoShop and Lightroom, as well as video editing software like Final Cut Pro,so you’ll want to get to know how to read these graphs as a tool to get better exposed images and digital films.

And for an advanced lesson, take a look at how using the histogram fits right in to Ansel Adams’s “Zone System” and stay tuned for more on the subject…

iPhone 5 vs. Hasselblad

 

 

The iPhone 5 has one of the best cameras built in to a phone to date, but how well does it compare to a professional DSLR or medium format camera such as a Hasselblad H2D that sells for over $20,000! Watch this video to see if you could spot the difference. Could you do it?

Flying Canon 5D Mkii

 

Birds Eye Productions has an amazing service which flys all sorts of cameras with their custom octacopter that can shoot photos and videos from the air.

Shooting Ballerinas in Natural Light

 

Von Wong recently shot a group of dancers from the Nation Sloviak Theater and he shot them in the city using ambient light. Watch how he posed the models and setup his shoots to get a dreamy look.

What’s in Our (Video) Camera Bag!

Earlier this week we posted a What’s in Our Camera Bag video on our Facebook fan page to show our fans how we travel. If you haven’t already liked our Facebook fan page, feel free to do so and watch our video!

 

Hugo final scene Steady Cam Shot

 

Shooting with a big rig on a steadicam is no easy task and Larry McConkey did an amazing job filming the final scene of Hugo which lasts for almost two minutes. It’s an incredible one shot scene and in the video above you can see the finished scene and the behind the scenes shot (via a camera on top of the camera).

 

Instagram from your DSLR!

 

By using the Eye-Fi X2 SD card and mobile app you can wirelessly transfer photos to your phone and post them on Instagram just moments after you take them. The Eye-fi card is also useful for geotagging photos and uploading to photo sharing sites like Flickr and Facebook.

 

If you use a camera that only takes CF cards like our Canon 5d mkii then you can use one of these CF to SD adapters.

Bob Holmes – Make Sure to Check Your Settings!

 

Even the best of us forget about some of the settings on our camera. Here’s a quick video from Bob Holmes remind you what you need to check.

The Nikon D3200 is announced.

 

The Nikon D3200 is Nikon’s newest entry level camera. Once you take a look at the spec list, it might not seem so entry-level.

 

Specs:

24.2 Megapixel CMOS APS-C Sensor

4 Frames per second burst mode

ISO 100-6400

1080p HD video at 24/30 fps

 

This is also Nikon’s first consumer DSLR that has manual exposure control for video, it also has a microphone input for better sound. For only $699.95 it’s a pretty great buy.

 

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